Equity

Where the Prison Population Is Rising

Overall, the prison population is decreasing, but in some states, it’s higher than ever. A new report looks at trends state by state.

What Surfers Understand About Gentrification

When it comes to waves, newcomers are not wanted.

Occupy Wall Street protesters rally in Canal Street in Lower Manhattan in November 2011.

How Centuries of Protest Shaped New York City

A new book traces the “citymaking process” of riots and rebellions since the era of Dutch colonization to the present.

Maryland Governor Larry Hogan signs bills for Metro funding and Amazon incentives in Rockville on April 25.

Why Do Politicians Waste So Much Money on Corporate Incentives?

Political scientist Nathan Jensen answers questions about his new book, Incentives to Pander.

The Disputed Second Life of an American Internment Camp

In Northern California, a debate is raging about a plan to build a fence around the small airport sitting on a site where people of Japanese ancestry, most of whom were American citizens, were forcibly interned.

As Michigan’s Municipal Water Crisis Drags on, Its Bottled Water Industry Booms

Nestlé pays the state a pittance in exchange for its water at a time when public awareness of water issues is rising.

An Unusual Idea for Fixing School Segregation

What if the answer lies in changing how college admissions work?

Mapping the Segregation of Metro Atlanta’s Amenities

A new mapping project shows how segregation is a matter of whether you have close access to a grocery store, hospital, bank, or park—amenities that influence your quality of life.

The 17 architects and designers in the first cohort of Public Practice have been charged with boosting the influence of good planning on London.

London’s Big Push for Better Design

The city's Public Practice program is embedding experienced architects and planners around the area in an effort to speed housing construction and get more inclusive public spaces.

Reverse Migration Might Turn Georgia Blue

More black people from the Northeast and Midwest are moving to Atlanta. That could help elect the nation’s first black female governor.

Arne Duncan Is Very Serious About a Massive School Boycott

The former education secretary thinks parents need to take radical action on gun laws.

Volunteer Wen Hsien holds up a sign offering free acupuncture on the last day of a free health care clinic set up by Remote Area Medical in Inglewood, California.

The ‘Barefoot Doctors’ Serving America's Cities

Since it took root in the U.S. during the Gold Rush, Chinese medicine has served marginalized communities, from immigrants to Black Panthers to sex workers.

A person walks past the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.

Revisiting the New Urban Crisis

The shift toward a more inclusive urbanism has begun. But it will require time, commitment from city institutions, and political agency at the local level.

What Will It Take to Desegregate Chicago?

A new report offers a roadmap to inclusive growth.

A man sleeps in a doorway in downtown Portland, Ore., on Sept. 19, 2017.

A Healthcare Giant Enters the Battle for Cheaper Housing

Kaiser Permanente is pledging $200 million toward fighting homelessness and building more low-cost housing in eight states, plus D.C.

What Is Loitering, Really?

America’s laws against lingering have roots in Medieval and Elizabethan England. Since 1342, the goal has always been to keep anyone “out of place” away.

Wyatt Cenac Is Here to Solve Your Policing Problems

In his new HBO series “Problem Areas,” comedian-actor Wyatt Cenac takes a crack at solving police racism.

The Malcolm X Murals of America

Thirty years ago, his likeness could be found in many poor, minority communities. Today, these images are disappearing as the buildings they were painted on have either collapsed or have been demolished.

A bus stop in the Estonian town of Värska

Estonia Will Roll Out Free Public Transit Nationwide

Meet the new world leader in fare-free living.

A groundskeeper at a country club in Rochester, New York

The Jobs That Are Getting Priced Out of Superstar Cities

It’s not high costs alone that are pushing people out of expensive cities—whole categories of jobs are underrepresented there.

The Deal That Might Just Break Georgia Into Pieces

This would be the de-gentrification of the city of Stockbridge, with its wealthy areas carved away for a new city while remaining residents pick up the substantial tab left behind.