Life

Felipe Rose.

A Gay Icon Remembers Life in the Village, and in the Village People

Fifty years after Stonewall, Felipe Rose—“The Indian” from the Village People—remembers New York City’s Greenwich Village as the gay rights movement took hold.

A photo of Murray Park in Long Island City, New York.

Can Parks Help Cities Fight Crime?

Research on the connections between green space and criminal activity finds that park design and programming determines their impact on crime and safety.

A photo of a monarch butterfly perched on a pink flower.

Pollinator Cities Really Could Save the Monarchs

The milkweed needed to stabilize the country’s monarch-butterfly population thrives in metropolitan areas—especially on residential land.

a photo of Zurich, Switzerland

Death to Livability!

What does it really mean when certain kinds of cities keep getting ranked as the world’s “most livable”?

McDonald's Restaurants Are America's Ultimate 'Third Places'

Americans have fewer and fewer spaces to gather. That’s where nuggets come in.

The Squirrel Census Answers a Question You Weren’t Asking

How many squirrels live in New York City's Central Park? Finding the answer was surprisingly complicated.

a photo of a woman covering her ears on a noisy NYC subway platform

My Quixotic Quest for Quiet in New York City

In a booming city, the din of new construction and traffic can be intolerable. Enter Hush City, an app to map the sounds of silence.   

How New York’s Media Covered the Stonewall Riots

Major dailies gave a megaphone to the police, while alternative outlets served as an important platform for those without a voice.

A photo of a cyclist on the streets of Chicago's Pilsen neighborhood.

Can Historic Preservation Cool Down a Hot Neighborhood?

The new plan to landmark Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood aims to protect more than just buildings: It’s designed to curb gentrification.

Two men with yellow hard hats surrounded by technology boxes

Job Density Is Increasing in Superstar Cities and Sprawling in Others

A study finds job density increased in the U.S. over a 10-year period. But four cities: New York, Chicago, San Francisco, and Seattle, accounted for most of it.

The Essential Map for LGBTQ Outdoor Enthusiasts

For Pride Month, two organizations are making it easier to find LGBTQ outdoor recreation groups across the U.S.

Four young adults exercise in a dark, neon-lit gym.

Luxury Gyms Invite You to Work Out, Hang Out, Or Just Work

With their invite-only policies and coworking spaces, high-end urban gyms aspire to be fitness studio, social club, and office rolled into one.

Berlin Will Freeze Rents for Five Years

Local lawmakers agreed to one of Europe’s most radical rental laws, but it sets the stage for a battle with Germany’s national government.

At an NBA game, a player attempts to block a player from the rival team who has the ball.

NBA Free Agents Cluster in Superstar Cities, Too

Pro basketball follows the winner-take-all geography of America as a whole, with free agents gravitating to New York, L.A., and other big cities.

a screenshot of a video about Baltimore's Metro

It’s Time to Celebrate Baltimore’s Much-Maligned Metro

In 1987, the Maryland Transit Administration busted out a brass band to open a subway that never had a chance.

Two men jump into Lake Michigan at a Chicago beach.

How Chicago Got a Lot Faster at Beach Water Warnings

Chicago is the only major U.S. city to use a new method to test for bacteria at most of its beaches—and then issue same-day swimming advisories.

A cat lays flat on a bench at a park on the outskirts of Tokyo.

Why Don't Americans Use Their Parks at Night?

Most cities aren’t fond of letting people use parks after dark. But there are good lifestyle, environmental, and safety reasons to reconsider.

People holding protest signs.

Seniors Get Angry About Broken Promises for Affordable Housing in NYC

Mayor Bill de Blasio walked back a promise of $500 million in affordable senior housing. New York’s rapidly growing elderly population came out to protest.

A map of apartment searches in the U.S.

Where America’s Renters Want to Move Next

A new report that tracks apartment searches between U.S. cities reveals the moving aspirations of a certain set of renters.

A man walks by an abandoned home in Youngstown, Ohio

How Some Shrinking Cities Are Still Prospering

A study finds that some shrinking cities are prosperous areas with smaller, more-educated populations. But they also have greater levels of income inequality.