Life

What Surfers Understand About Gentrification

When it comes to waves, newcomers are not wanted.

A woman holds an iced drink with a plastic straw at a Starbucks location.

New York City Will Consider a Ban on Plastic Straws

City Council member Rafael Espinal introduced the bill, calling the city’s dependence on plastic “a trend we have to reverse immediately.”

Are ‘Pee Beds’ a Fix for Public Urination?

In an effort to clean up popular sites of outdoor urination, researchers studied the mind of the man who pees in public. Their work could make stadiums and festival grounds smell a lot fresher in the future.

Commuters in Seoul watch news of the cancelled summit between the U.S. and North Korea.

In Seoul, Sadness and Skepticism After Trump Cancels North Korea Summit

Many residents of the South Korean capital are hoping that U.S. diplomacy will continue.   

The Dirty, Noisy Power Behind Those Street-Fair Tacos

In many cities, summer means outdoor concerts and street fairs. It also means the polluting generators that power them. So how bad for the environment are they?

Mapping America’s Aging Population

Over the past 50 years, Americans have steadily gotten older, more bicoastal, and less likely to move to a new city.

Occupy Wall Street protesters rally in Canal Street in Lower Manhattan in November 2011.

How Centuries of Protest Shaped New York City

A new book traces the “citymaking process” of riots and rebellions since the era of Dutch colonization to the present.

A sign for women-first parking in a Seoul shopping center.

What’s Up With Seoul’s Pink Parking Spaces for Women?

They’re like regular parking spaces. Except, you know, pink.

A metal sculpture in the shape of a corn cob near a road in Iowa City, Iowa.

Rural and Urban America Have More in Common Than You Think

A new Pew Research Center survey shows where the geographical divide is overstated.

Volunteer Wen Hsien holds up a sign offering free acupuncture on the last day of a free health care clinic set up by Remote Area Medical in Inglewood, California.

The ‘Barefoot Doctors’ Serving America's Cities

Since it took root in the U.S. during the Gold Rush, Chinese medicine has served marginalized communities, from immigrants to Black Panthers to sex workers.

Passengers line up for a bullet train at a platform in Tokyo Station.

The Amazing Psychology of Japanese Train Stations

The nation’s famed mastery of rail travel has been aided by some subtle behavioral tricks.

A disposal box at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas, Nevada. The tear stains around it have dried.

Federal Law Leaves Marijuana in a No-Fly Zone

Federal regulations mean that passengers flying from one weed-legal destination to another with their personal stash may still be breaking the law, but in at least one U.S. airport, that weed can fly.

A detail from a 1942 British Mandate map of Haifa, now a city in Israel.

Mapping Palestine Before Israel

A new open-source project uses British historical maps to reveal what Palestine looked like before 1948.

What Is Loitering, Really?

America’s laws against lingering have roots in Medieval and Elizabethan England. Since 1342, the goal has always been to keep anyone “out of place” away.

Wyatt Cenac Is Here to Solve Your Policing Problems

In his new HBO series “Problem Areas,” comedian-actor Wyatt Cenac takes a crack at solving police racism.

The Malcolm X Murals of America

Thirty years ago, his likeness could be found in many poor, minority communities. Today, these images are disappearing as the buildings they were painted on have either collapsed or have been demolished.

The Top Cities Americans Move to—and From—For Work

Most of the top cities are the usual suspects, but there’s something odd happening in Silicon Valley.

Is Washington Big Enough for Two Tech Giants?

Apple and Amazon could be neighbors.

This Estonian Town Just Made the Cannabis Leaf its New Logo

Kanepi, Estonia’s new symbol is pretty dope.

New homes under construction in St. George, Utah, in 2013

America's Fastest-Growing Urban Area Has a Water Problem

As St. George, Utah grows, it will have to cut down on its high water consumption or pay handsomely for it—or both.